Wednesday, July 14, 2010

The real Camelot

by Miriam
I’ve been fascinated by the Arthurian legend since I was a kid. The impossible struggle to be good in the face of temptation and evil, the idea that a belief in magic is as necessary for survival as the quest for something of meaning, the courage and passion and the heartbreaking losses and defeats, the notion that the human spirit can triumph over the darkness that sometimes threatens to engulf us…all that and Excalibur. I’ve read dozens of versions over the years, from Chretien de Troyes’ to Alfred Lord Tennyson’s to John Steinbeck’s to T.H. White’s to Mary Stewart’s to Richard Monaco’s to Marion Zimmer Bradley’s, and always hoped that there was more than myth and folklore to the story of the great King Arthur and his court.

So, it was with great delight that I came upon this piece in the Daily Mail. How cool is the discovery that there was, in fact, a real Round Table (which was not a table at all)? Hopefully, the new information will spark a new wave of Arthurian storytelling.

4 comments:

  1. Ooooh, this is exciting! (Wish I had cable so I could watch the documentary.) I am an lover of all things Arthurian. :) Hmmm, do I feel a new story? Perhaps...

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  2. Mists of Avalon is one of my all time favorite books.

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  3. I'm right with you - obsessed with Arthurian legend since reading the Mists of Avalon! I wrote a paper in high school defending the historical basis of Camelot - I even cited the dude in the article.

    But I dunno - Chester is awfully far from Glastonbury, at least in Middle Ages distance. And since I've visited the "site of Arthur and Guinevere's graves," I'm fondest of Glastonbury. :)

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  4. Fascinating. I think there is always some truth behind our culture's enduring myths. Thanks so much for this!

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